Tuesday, December 1, 2015

Identity Theft: The Digital Doppelganger


"But he that fliches from me my good name/Robs me of that which not enriches him/And makes me poor indeed." (Shakespeare, Othello, Act iii, Sc.3.)

We live in a modern digital world where there exists a growing and unknown threat from cyber thieves. As we approach the end of the summer and begin to prepare for the holiday season, we must realize that we all are at risk of identity theft. In the era of quick internet searches one can find out a treasure trove of information on people with nothing more than a name and maybe an address. Understanding and awareness is what can mean the difference between proactively stopping a crime in its tracks or working reactively for months, if not years, to repair the damage.

What Is Identity Theft?

As defined by the RCMP Identity Theft is acquiring someone else's personal information for criminal intent (Royal Canadian Mounted Police). There are a myriad of methods that these thieves employ to gain your personal information and data. From the relatively  low tech 'shoulder serf' where an individual watches from behind or within eye sight of a machine, as you enter numerical information, such as an ATM pin or postal code at a gas station pump, to the more advanced 'fishing' emails.

Get the Complete Article from the following link:

Monday, November 16, 2015

Prevention of Slip, Trips & Falls



Why is prevention of slips, trips and falls important?
In Canada over 42,000 workers get injured annually due to fall accidents. This number represents about 17% of the "time-loss injuries" that were accepted by workers' compensation boards or commissions across Canada (based on statistics from Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada, 2011).

How do falls happen?
Statistics show that the majority (66%) of falls happen on the same level resulting from slips and trips. The remaining 34% are falls from a height.

Slips
Slips happen where there is too little friction or traction between the footwear and the walking surface. Common causes of slips are:
  • wet or oily surfaces
  • occasional spills
  • weather hazards
  • loose, unanchored rugs or mats
  • flooring or other walking surfaces that do not have same degree of traction in all areas

Trips
Trips happen when your foot collides (strikes, hits) an object causing you to lose the balance and, eventually fall. Common causes of tripping are:
  • obstructed view
  • poor lighting
  • clutter in your way
  • wrinkled carpeting
  • uncovered cables
  • bottom drawers not being closed
  • uneven (steps, thresholds) walking surfaces

How to prevent falls due to slips and trips?
Both slips and trips result from some a kind of unintended or unexpected change in the contact between the feet and the ground or walking surface. This shows that good housekeeping, quality of walking surfaces (flooring), selection of proper footwear, and appropriate pace of walking are critical for preventing fall accidents.

Housekeeping
Good housekeeping is the first and the most important (fundamental) level of preventing falls due to slips and trips. It includes:
  • cleaning all spills immediately
  • marking spills and wet areas
  • mopping or sweeping debris from floors
  • removing obstacles from walkways and always keeping them free of clutter
  • securing (tacking, taping, etc.) mats, rugs and carpets that do not lay flat
  • always closing file cabinet or storage drawers
  • covering cables that cross walkways
  • keeping working areas and walkways well lit
  • replacing used light bulbs and faulty switches

Without good housekeeping practices, any other preventive measures such as installation of sophisticated flooring, specialty footwear or training on techniques of walking and safe falling will never be fully effective.

Flooring
Changing or modifying walking surfaces is the next level of preventing slip and trips. Recoating or replacing floors, installing mats, pressure-sensitive abrasive strips or abrasive-filled paint-on coating and metal or synthetic decking can further improve safety and reduce risk of falling. However, it is critical to remember that high-tech flooring requires good housekeeping as much as any other flooring. In addition, resilient, non-slippery flooring prevents or reduces foot fatigue and contributes to slip prevention measures.

Footwear
In workplaces where floors may be oily or wet or where workers spend considerable time outdoors, prevention of fall accidents should focus on selecting proper footwear. Since there is no footwear with anti-slip properties for every condition, consultation with manufacturers' is highly recommended.  Properly fitting footwear increases comfort and prevents fatigue which, in turn, improves safety for the employee.

What can you do to avoid falling at work?

You can reduce the risk of slipping on wet flooring by:
  • taking your time and paying attention to where you are going
  • adjusting your stride to a pace that is suitable for the walking surface and the tasks you are doing
  • walking with the feet pointed slightly outward
  • making wide turns at corners

You can reduce the risk of tripping by:
  • keeping walking areas clear from clutter or obstructions
  • keeping flooring in good condition
  • always using installed light sources that provide sufficient light for your tasks
  • using a flashlight if you enter a dark room where there is no light
  • ensuring that things you are carrying or pushing do not prevent you from seeing any obstructions, spills, etc.

Thursday, November 5, 2015

Detect Deter Report


It was 4 am and Security Guard (SG) Keith was making his rounds, when he encountered an open door leading to the employee parking lot. Upon further inspection he noticed that the door had been propped open using a folded piece of cardboard. So he immediately took photographic evidence of the open door and then stepped outside to survey the parking lot to see if he could view anyone loitering or within view. After not seeing anyone, he stepped back in through the open door and removed the cardboard. SG Keith then radioed in to the command post what he had discovered prompting all on-duty guards of the situation and thereby a sense of heightened vigilance. Finally, after completing his rounds he filed an Incident Report so that further action would be taken to address the event.

Does this sound like a plausible event? Did Security Guard Keith fulfil his duties? Were the actions of SG Keith able to achieve the Securitas mission? In the field of security a guard must be keenly aware of the important functions tied to their position. At the heart of it, and the reason private security was even established, lies a three prong role of the security guard - Detecting, Deterring, and Reporting. It is these tasks, which are also at the core of a Securitas guard's position, and which our clients are expecting from us in the course of a day's work. On the face of it this seems like a pretty straight forward concept, but one must understand all the interrelated assignments that are associated with these functions. To fully comprehend this let's examine each of the three major roles one by one.

Download our This Month's Spotlight from the following link:

http://goo.gl/FF4Ae7

Monday, September 21, 2015

Employee Wellness: Tips for Healthy Living



With busy schedules and lifestyles, keeping the mind, body and soul healthy can be a major challenge. Securitas would like to offer these tips to help everyone live a happy, healthy, safe and balanced life:
  • Get Physical – Exercise not only helps you build muscle, lose weight and gain self-confidence, but it's vital in maintaining a healthy heart. And, don't think you need to spend hours at the gym to achieve a new physical you. From strength training and cardio workouts, to walking the dog or taking the stairs – anything that gets your heart pumping will benefit your health.
  • Stress is a Mess – Over time, stress can lead to serious health issues such as obesity, depression and even death. Wellness experts suggest that when you start seeing red, instead think blue – as in blueberries. Antioxidants found in the tasty fruit fight stress hormones. Also, don't forget to breathe. Inhaling a deep breath for 5 seconds then exhaling for another 5 seconds can help clear your mind and enhance blood circulation.
  • LOL, Laugh Out Loud – Build your immune system through laughter! Health-increasing hormones like endorphins are released into your body when you laugh. Additionally, laughter works your abdominal muscles.
  • Eat Healthy – We know we should eat healthy, choose the ideal proportions or foods and food groups to eat according to your body size and structure.  For more information, please reference Canada's Food Guide.
  • Get Plenty of Zzzzzz's – Between work, family and extra activities, it's sometimes difficult to get the necessary 6 to 8 hours of sleep per night. Be sure to avoid caffeine or exercise right before bed. Instead, try reading a book or mediating.
  • What's Up, Doc? – Going to the doctor only when you're sick isn't going to cut it. For both your physical and mental well-being, it's wise to have a routine annual physical examination. Especially if your family has a history of health problems, such as heart disease, diabetes or high blood pressure, getting regular check-ups can help prevent or detect serious health issues.
  • Yoga-tta Do It – Yoga, an ancient practice of stretching and breathing techniques, has become a popular exercise for both men and women. In addition to releasing positive energy, yoga prevents injuries, promotes flexibility and can add relief to a stressful day.
  • The Right to Recreation – You schedule meetings and appointments each week, so why not schedule time for recreation? Be sure to set time each week for activities you enjoy. Whether it's dinner with family and friends, or taking the phone off the hook and curling up with a good book, be sure to block out time on your calendar with activities that you enjoy and will rejuvenate you.


Monday, September 14, 2015

Identity Theft: The Digital Doppelganger


"But he that fliches from me my good name/Robs me of that which not enriches him/And makes me poor indeed." (Shakespeare, Othello, Act iii, Sc.3.)

We live in a modern digital world where there exists a growing and unknown threat from cyber thieves. As we approach the end of the summer and begin to prepare for the holiday season, we must realize that we all are at risk of identity theft. In the era of quick internet searches one can find out a treasure trove of information on people with nothing more than a name and maybe an address. Understanding and awareness is what can mean the difference between proactively stopping a crime in its tracks or working reactively for months, if not years, to repair the damage.

Monday, August 10, 2015

Learn Proper Work Email Etiquette, Today


What is proper email etiquette while at work?

Ask yourself two questions when preparing a work email. First, “Is it inappropriate?” and second, “Will it offend anyone?” If you can answer yes to either or you are not sure then err on the side of caution and do not click that send button.

The best rule is always use a common sense approach to email then you will not have anything to worry about. In this day and age of social media and digital technology keep your professional and private lives separate. If you would never say it to someone's face then do not send it to their email! 

In this issue:
  • What is email etiquette?
  • "I deleted it, but is it really gone?"
  • Learn clear and concise communication skills
Continue reading...

Wednesday, July 22, 2015

How do you Create Efficiencies without Compromising Security?





True alternatives create efficiency while saving both time and money. Today's economic environment is driving many companies to strike a delicate balance between managing costs and continuing to maintain high standards for their security program. So it's not surprising that companies are looking for a possible way to reduce expenses; security services are often the easy target. But compromising security can create vulnerabilities that could end up costing thousands, if not millions of dollars.

We understand the need to manage costs without compromising security. That's why we've developed Integrated Guarding, a three-dimensional approach to security. This innovative solution combines On-site Guarding with Remote Guarding and Mobile Guarding to provide the most efficient, cost-effective solution for all security needs. Securitas officers perform vital functions that rely on friendly, consistent human interaction but also have a wealth of resources on hand to cover core duties in non-traditional ways. After an operational analysis, we develop custom-tailored alternatives to cover any unique security need.


Thursday, June 18, 2015

Spotting Suspicious Activity


The milder weather of spring coaxes green stems to sprout and dreams of travel to blossom. Unfortunately, the weeds of terrorism also sneak out of their underground hiding places and attempt to blend into the crowd of budding spring flowers. Travel experts are forecasting a sunny season for increased tourism in 2015. At the same time, security experts are forecasting a stormy year of increased terrorist activity. Unlike the lovely spring flowers, terrorists cannot thrive in the bright light of day. They prefer to strike from the shadows; blending in with innocent people so as to make detection of their despicable plans more difficult. The challenge for the security professional, and the general public, is to spot the weeds as they are sprouting and rip them out by the roots before they can overrun the flower beds. 

Focus Your Vigilance 

Most tourists tend to be curious and somewhat adventuresome, occasionally wandering off the beaten path to discover new sights and experiences. Terrorists may also be curious and adventuresome when planning an attack. How will you tell the difference between the two groups? You will have to be alert to some subtle differences in behaviour.

Download and Read the complete Spotlight on Security from the following link:

http://goo.gl/05cbD5

* This guide is for informational purposes only and does not contain Securitas Canada’s complete policy and procedures. For more information, contact your Supervisor or Branch Manager.

Monday, June 8, 2015

Your Guide to Travel Smart & Safe


Are you "leaving on a jet plane," "rolling down the river," boarding the "Chattanooga Choo Choo," or just "cruising down the highway, looking for adventure?" Travel can broaden your knowledge and enrich your spirit. So, let's start packing! But remember to pack more than just your clothes. Pack one of Securitas's core values, Vigilance to help make your travel safe and secure.

One of the very first things you should do is to make a thorough checklist of all the items you need to pack and to take care of before you leave. Did you remember to put a hold on your mail? Did you confirm your hotel reservation? Did you get your traveler's checks? Have you packed any medications you might need? With so many different things to remember, it is easy to overlook something. Making a checklist will help you keep it all straight. In the same way that a good security officer should check their post orders, a good traveler will verify that every item on their checklist is packed or taken care of before they set foot out of the home.

The attached handbook provide you some safety tips on how to travel smart. Click on the Download Link Below for your copy of the handbook.

Three Golden Rules

These safety tips are only a few of the dozens recommended and following them will help make our travel safer. At the root of each of these safety tips are three simple rules that apply to daily living as well as to travel.
  • Plan ahead 
  • Remain vigilant 
  • Use your common sense
Following these three key safety rules and applying the safety tips can help make your travel experience both secure and satisfying. Have a nice trip!



***This guide is for informational purposes only and does not contain Securitas Canada's complete policy and procedures. For more information, contact your Supervisor or Branch Manager.***

Tuesday, May 12, 2015

Keeping Safe from Office Creepers



Heading out to lunch, Sally began to push open the security door when a well-dressed man, carrying a large briefcase, grabbed the door handle from the other side and held the door open for her. "Have a nice lunch." The man said as Sally smiled and strode past him. "I guess chivalry is not dead after all," she thought cheerfully. After a pleasant lunch at the local café, Sally returned to her office in good spirits; only to discover that her laptop computer was missing. Remorsefully, Sally realized she had been the unwitting accomplice of a 'chivalrous' thief.

Who Are the Office Creepers?

Office creepers are persons who enter buildings to steal from the company or individuals. These thieves do not limit themselves to office buildings. They have invaded schools, warehouses, high rise buildings, and even hospitals where they steal from helpless patients! They are devious and adaptable thieves who usually do their best to blend into the surroundings. They may disguise themselves by dressing like a typical business person, office worker, sales person, maintenance personnel, cleaning staff, repair person, or delivery person. They can be male or female and of any race or ethnicity. The one thing they all have in common is their desire to take what is yours. Vigilance and strict adherence to company rules can keep the creepers out of the cubicles. A person you do not recognize may be a creeper if they are exhibiting any of these behaviors:
  • entering and exiting multiple offices, cubicles, or rooms, usually for only a minute or two
  • waiting near a security entrance, especially when it is close to lunch time, or the start or end of the work day 
  • peeking into multiple offices, cubicles, or rooms and not entering if they are occupied.
  • This person may be stealing, or looking for unoccupied areas from which to steal. If you notice any suspicious person, alert the security office immediately.

Security Can Thwart Creepers

A security guard's job is to protect the client's property and personnel against harm. The guard has three "tools" that have proven beneficial in the prevention of criminal activity. They are detection, deterrence, and reporting.

Detection

By remaining alert and vigilant, a security guard should be aware of any strangers entering the premises. The vigilant guard should pay special attention to any stranger at the job site. The guard should observe the person's behavior and appearance, looking for signs of:
  • uneasiness or uncertainty 
  • lack of proper identification (insofar as Post Orders permit ID inspection), or fake IDs 
  • loitering near security barriers
  • "tailgating" (tailgaters can bypass a security barrier by closely following an authorized person through it) 
  • "shoulder surfing" (trying to see a security code an authorized person is entering on a keypad)

Deterrence

The presence of an alert, uniformed, security guard is often enough to deter a criminal from attempting to invade the premises, but not always. That is why it is very important that the guard knows the Post Orders and the client's security procedures. The guard should always strive to enforce the security rules of the site. Depending on Post Orders, a guard might control access in these ways:
  • Request that visitors sign the "Visitor Log." This lets the strangers know that you are alert to their presence.
  • Politely ask if you can assist them in finding their way. This will give you the opportunity to ask them about the purpose of their visit and who they are visiting.
  • Confirm that the visitor is expected by contacting the receiver of the visit.
  • Request to see ID badges or other ID (i.e. driver's license, business card, etc.), if your Post Orders permit ID inspection. Verify that any ID badge is authentic.
  • Verify any requests for repairs if the stranger claims to be a repair person.
  • Verify that a delivery, or removal, is expected if the person claims to be a delivery person or a professional mover.
  • Securely store all keys, ID badges, and visitor passes.
  • Do not allow anyone, even persons you recognize, to "tailgate" through a security barrier.
  • If authorized by the Post Orders, request that the person allow a visual inspection of any bags, unsealed boxes, briefcases, or other containers they carry. If they are carrying an empty container into the facility, they may be planning on filling it with the client's property!

Reporting

Reporting serves to alert others about a creeper and can lead to the arrest and conviction of creepers. Because a guard's report may be used in a court of law, it is extremely important that the report be complete and accurate. A vigilant security guard will include as many of the following facts in their reports as possible.

Who is the person? Give a detailed description. Get their name and address. Describe the person's clothing, appearance, height, weight, hair and eye color, age, race, sex, and any distinguishing characteristics (i.e. facial hair, tattoos, piercings, scars, moles, warts, etc.).

What did the person do? Describe their actions and behavior. Did they sit in a lobby chair and read a magazine or did they wander around the lobby and rush towards doors that were opened? Did the person appear nervous or confident? Were they furtive or rowdy? In what way did they pass through a security barrier? Did they have a security barrier key or key code? Did they "tailgate" through the barrier behind an authorized person? Were they seen carrying any property out of the premises? Try to give a clear picture of their actions.

Where was the person? Were they only seen in the lobby or were they observed entering a doorway or walking down a corridor? Perhaps they were seen walking down a hallway and entering an office? Whose office? At what spot in the hallway were they first seen? Be precise. The exact location can be vital to a criminal investigation.

Notify neighboring facilities if a thief has struck at your facility. Cooperation counts in capturing a Creeper.

These are a few of the important observations that a good guard will record in a report. The Securitas Report Writing course has more advice on good report writing techniques.

How You Can Thwart Creepers

A Creeper might target any building, anywhere. As a worker in the building, it may seem that you are powerless to defend yourself against this sneak thief. Nothing could be further from the truth. In fact, you are the person with the most power to defeat this criminal. By following a few simple precautions, you can frustrate a Creeper's attempts at theft. Use these tactics to stop a Creeper cold.
  • Do not share keys, access cards, or access codes and never leave them lying around unattended. 
  • Do not open an access barrier for unauthorized persons. 
  • Report lost keys and access cards. 
  • Keep purses or wallets with you or locked in a drawer. 
  • Lock your door when you leave the office. 
  • Secure laptop computers and other devices to your desk with security cables or lock them in a drawer.
  • Mute your telephone or have your calls forwarded to you when you are out of your office (a ringing telephone can tip off a Creeper that your office is unoccupied). 
  • Report suspicious strangers to your supervisor and/or security personnel. 
  • Keep company information secure. Lock up data storage devices. Never share passwords or leave written copies unsecured (taping your password under your keyboard is a bad idea – it is one of the first places a thief will look).

What to Do If You Find a Creeper

If you see a crime being committed, do not attempt to apprehend the criminal. Your safety is far more valuable than any object. Follow these guidelines.
  • Do not confront or challenge the Creeper. 
  • Retreat to a safe area. 
  • Contact your supervisor and/or security personnel. 
  • As soon as possible, write down everything you saw; describe the event, the items stolen, and the thief in as much detail as you can.
*This guide is for informational purposes only and does not contain Securitas Canada's complete policy and procedures. For more information, contact your Supervisor or Branch Manager.

Tuesday, April 28, 2015

Develop Effective and Devoted Employees


Far too often we look to client relations to fix client issues rather than employee relations. Don't get me wrong, client relationship building is extremely important, but so are the relationships we need to build with our employees. As a Branch Manager you may get to see your client once or twice a month but your employees see him or her every day. This means that how well your employees feel about the company, and their manager will more than likely get passed on directly or indirectly to the client. So the more effectively we engage, recognize and manage our employees will help you in the work you do to improve your client relationships.

Engaging people starts with onboarding and how we bring them into the company, because it helps people to understand their role in the organization and where they fit in. If they do not feel like they fit in, then they question their ability to fit at all.

You need to show your employees, you care. It's not enough to just provide them with a job, employees need to recognized, validated and appreciated for the value and drive they bring. It is imperative that we ask ourselves, "How do we engage our employees who have allowed us to get to the point we are right now." One way is to provide continuous learning throughout their careers with Securitas. Organizations that enjoy high retention of employees establish learning development plans for their employees and mentor them through the learning, to ensure understanding of the material.

It's important that you have open and honest discussions with your employees especially when it comes to your expectations, their performance and the feedback you provide. Good coaching and counselling can go a long way to help improve engagement in an employee, and allow them to grow as a valued member of your team.

All too often managers find themselves spending most of their time fixing issues created by about 8% of their workforce and have little time to look at the other 92% who are doing an excellent job. However, to keep employees engaged we need to ensure that we recognize the excellent work the other 92% do or they will see that the only way to get recognized is to become part of the 8%. Recognizing an employee does not need to have a monetary value to have a great impact. A personal phone call, handwritten thank-you note, email announcement, nomination to Guard of the Year or acknowledgement during a team meeting can go a long way to make this person feel appreciated and engaged.

Learning to create a team of engaged employees will help you to stabilize your team and send a message indirectly through your employees that Securitas is a good organization and one the client can be proud to be partnered with.

By Warren Young
----------------------------------------------------------

Warren Young is the National Director of Training at Securitas Canada.

Securitas has been providing security services since 1934. With over 7,000 people in Canada and 310,000 people globally we have the experience and knowledge to offer a broad range of Security services; including On Site Security Guard Services, Mobile Guarding, Remote Guarding, Technology Solutions, Corporate Risk Management and Investigations.

Tuesday, April 7, 2015

Security… Certified.


Some things you can compromise on, some things you can't.  Protecting your staff, residents, property and assets are one of those things you shouldn't compromise on…. Ever.  You want a security service provider with uncompromising quality and standards for the provision of services, support, and operations.  You want a security company that is ISO Certified.

The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) is an independent organization with 163 member countries with a Central Secretariat (head office) located in Geneva Switzerland.   ISO was founded in 1947 with a mandate of creating an international organization 'to facilitate the international coordination and unification of industrial standards'.  Since then, experts from all over the world have worked together to develop standards and have published almost 20,000 International Standards.

International Standards are strategic tools and guidelines to help companies tackle some of the most demanding challenges in business. They ensure that business operations are as efficient as possible, increase productivity, and help companies access new markets.

Benefits of ISO certification include:
  • Cost savings - optimize operations and therefore reduce costs
  • Enhanced customer satisfaction - improve quality, enhance customer satisfaction
  • Access to new markets - prevent trade barriers and open up global markets
  • Increased market share - increase productivity and competitive advantage
  • Environmental benefits - help reduce negative impacts on the environment
ISO 9001:2008 sets out the criteria for a quality management system and is based on a number of quality management principles including a strong customer focus, processes, and continuous improvement.  ISO 9001:2008 specifies requirements for a quality management system where an organization:

  • Must demonstrate its ability to consistently provide products or services that meet customer and applicable regulatory requirements
  • Aims to enhance customer satisfaction through the effective application of the system, including processes for continuous improvement of the system and the assurance of conformity to customer and applicable regulatory requirements

ISO 9001:2008 helps ensure that customers get consistent, good quality products and services.

Several security companies in Canada are ISO certified for their administrative processes.  BUT, there is only 1 security company in Canada that is ISO certified for the provision of security services – Securitas Canada.   Securitas obtained ISO 9001:2008 certification in 2014; and works every day to improve processes, the products and the services that it provides its customers.  Becoming ISO certified demonstrates Securitas' uncompromising commitment to quality and the continuous improvement of all processes and programs.  The never ending search for excellence and industry leadership is what sets Securitas apart from its customers.

Securitas, a global leader in the security industry, has been providing security services since 1899. With over 7,000 people in 24 offices in Canada, and 310,000 people globally, they have the experience and knowledge to offer a broad range of services; including On-Site Guarding, Remote Guarding, Mobile Guarding, Technology Solutions, Risk Management, and Investigations.  Their Integrated Guarding Solutions will allow customers to customize their security program by combining any security offerings resulting in Cost Efficiencies, Increased Security Flexibility, and Service Unification.  

Thursday, March 19, 2015

Security Services for the Construction Industry


Theft and vandalism have become an increasing problem in the construction industry.  This adds unnecessary cost and time to any construction project.  It is becoming increasingly important for companies to protect their property, assets and staff.  Securitas, one of the world's largest and most trusted names in security, has the experience, technology and people to protect your site, trailer, materials, tools, and equipment.

Securitas' main service offerings are security guard services, mobile patrol, remote video monitoring, access control, technical solutions and consulting, and investigation services.   Securitas' Integrated Guarding Solution allows customers to combine any of our security services to create a customized solution that meets their specific needs.  Customers will reduce the risk of theft and vandalism by having a clearly identified security presence at their site 24/7.

Combine any service to create a customized security solution for your site.

On-Site Guarding
  • Access Control
  • Loss prevention
  • Emergency Response                                                 
  • Patrol and Inspections
  • Reception / Concierge
  • Fire and Life Safety
  • Traffic Control
  • Security System Management and Operation
  • Security Consulting
  • Labour Dispute Expertise & Coverage
Remote Guarding
  • Remote Alarm Video Verification
  • Remote Employee  Escort
  • Remote Exit/Entry Management
  • Remote Patrol Tours
  • Remote Perimeter Protection
  • Intrusion and Fire Alarm Monitoring
  • 24/7 Security Operations Centre
  • Remote Vagrant/Loitering Checks
Mobile Guarding
  • Alarm and Incident Response
  • Exterior and Interior Inspections
  • Perimeter/ Lot Patrols
  • Equipment / heater checks
  • Lock & Unlock Services
  • Escort Services
  • Location Specific Patrols
  • By Law Enforcement
  • Static Patrols
  • Electronic Tour Confirmation
  • Dedicated  / parked patrol vehicles
  • Temporary wireless & portable alarm systems
Securitas was at BUILDX Edmonton last week in order to meet with people from the construction industry and discuss the importance of security at construction sites.  BUILDEX is an international tradeshow related to construction and property management industries.

Thursday, February 19, 2015

10 STEPS TO HELP MAKE YOUR CAMPUS SAFER - HOW SAFE IS YOUR CAMPUS?



Marianna Perry, Area Training and Development Manager for Securitas USA in Kentucky, frequently conducts security assessments for colleges and universities. She states that unless a campus has a security review conducted by a qualified professional, college administration may not have a clear understanding of its potential security risks and vulnerabilities. "This is by no means intentional with college administrators," says Perry. "Often they just don't know what they need to make their campus more secure. What works best is a total and holistic approach to campus security. You can't just assume that what's needed are good locks and good lighting on campus; you have to approach safety and security from several perspectives." An effective security program requires not only good physical security measures with the right mix of technology, but also administrative policies and training. These requirements, Perry suggests, should be coupled with management support from the top down.

When addressing the physical security of a campus, it's critical that access control, locking devices, video surveillance, lighting, and intrusion detection systems are effective. The concepts of Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) are essential to a campus, along with trained, proactive law enforcement or security personnel.3 The appropriate technology must also be in place to make the system operate efficiently. "This means cost-effective as well as efficient," explains Perry.

"You have to integrate all the components of a security program to work in conjunction with each other. I often see a security policy written by middle management, but top administrators are not familiar with what the policy really entails. They need to know it, promote it, endorse it – and they have to require compliance."

Here are the 10 steps all school campuses should take to ensure everyone stay safe and sound:
  1. Have a Security Assessment conducted every two years or whenever there are significant changes to the campus, including buildings and/or grounds.
  2. Address “soft points of entry” Into the campus by utilizing appropriate physical security measures.
  3. Utilize technology along with physical security to deter crime and violence.
  4. Conduct mandatory freshman and new student orientation programs.
  5. Have an “active lock policy” especially on dorm room doors. 
  6. Campus law enforcement or security personnel must be on duty and visible 24/7, and be proactively involved in Community Policing strategies.
  7. Educate students, faculty and staff about safety and security programs, such as “walk me home” services, “blue light phones,” RAD or self-defense training, crisis hot lines, mental health/counseling services and other programs.
  8. Offer safety resources and crime prevention information to students about alcohol/drugs and sexual assault awareness/prevention/reporting.
  9. Educate and train students, faculty and staff on all campus emergency procedures and offer mass notification and security alerts through the use of social media as well as other means of communication. Involve local first responders in your training and drills.
  10. Implement an active social media program and monitor its use.
A campus safety and security program must find the right balance between creating an open environment and upholding the duty to protect students, faculty and staff. There must be a positive relationship between expenditures, personnel, technology, campus design and a crime prevention awareness/education to develop a program that is efficient and affordable. This type of program involves all members of the campus community, each doing their part to keep the campus safe.

This article is an abstract from a WhitePaper published by Securitas USA. You can view the full paper at the following link:

http://goo.gl/wAT16X

Securitas Canada offers a broad range of services that include specialized guarding, technology solutions, mobile guarding and corporate investigations. Securitas Canada is providing Campus Security to Universities and Collages Across Canada. To learn more about Campus Security Services provided by Securitas Canada, please visit http://www.securitas.com/ca/en-ca/Customer-Segments/Education/

Thursday, February 12, 2015

Peaceful or Problem? How to Cope with Crowds


A political rally, a rush-hour train platform, a labor strike protest, a rock concert, a department store holiday sale, and a family reunion are different events, but they all have one thing in common; a crowd of people. In most cases, these gatherings will end without serious incident. But sometimes, a peaceful crowd can become a threatening mob. As a security practitioner, you have a duty to protect persons and property, but what can you do if you are faced with an angry mob?

WHAT IS A MOB?

We live in a great country, where people are guaranteed the right to peacefully assemble in groups. These groups, or crowds, are simply a number of people temporarily gathered together for a common purpose. They can range in number from a handful to a stadium full. Crowds are generally peaceful, even crowds of protestors, but circumstances, either random or planned, can change a peaceful crowd into an angry mob. Emotional tensions in a large crowd can be increased simply by the congestion which reduces each individual's personal space. The event which has drawn the crowd can provoke intense emotional responses, such as a political rally or a hotly contested sporting event.

In a highly charged, emotional atmosphere, a crowd can sometimes erupt into an unruly mob if a spark of conflict is ignited. Even normally law abiding citizens can be caught up in the heat of the moment and become members of a destructive mob. This can occur spontaneously, as when a fight breaks out due to pushing or other rude  behavior.  Other times,  it  can  be  deliberately  caused   by   an agitator seeking to enflame the crowd. Tempers can flare up due to adverse weather, delays in gaining access to an event, or the use of alcohol and other drugs that can reduce inhibitions and impair rational thought. As a security professional, you should be on watch for any factor that can turn a peaceful crowd into a violent mob. Stay focused on the crowd and keep your team members and supervisors advised of any conditions that may provoke mob behavior.


PREPARATION FOR ANTICIPATED CROWDS

The possibility of a crowd becoming a mob can be minimized with proper advance planning. Your supervisor should provide you with complete information about the crowd before you go on duty. You will be better prepared to spot and respond to potential trouble if you know about …
  • the reason for the gathering or the type of event.
  • the area occupied.
  • the size of the expected crowd.
  • the characteristics of the people in the crowd.
  • the identity of potential troublemakers.
  • the location of command posts.
  • who to contact for assistance—including police, fire, and emergency personnel.
  • If your post orders do not cover these specifics, ask your supervisor for the information.
When a crowd is anticipated, supervisors should, where ever possible,  assign  security  practitioners   who  have  had  training  in crowd control, such as the classes available through the Securitas Center for Professional Development (SCPD).

As a uniformed symbol of authority, your presence can have a dramatic effect on crowd behavior and can help prevent the eruption of mob behavior. Maintain a visible presence and follow these guidelines to help you keep order and deter potential incitements of mob mentality.
  • Behave professionally – do not swagger, strut, swear, argue, or become hostile in any way.
  • Stay focused on the crowd, not the event.
  • Do not have physical contact with crowd members.
  • Keep calm and alert at all times. Do not show emotion.
  • Be polite, but not subservient. You must be seen as being in charge and in control while passively allowing lawful crowd behavior.
  • Do not respond to taunts, threats, or agitation.
  • Maintain an even tone of voice and do not try to "out shout" aggressive individuals.
  • Allow angry persons a chance to "vent" their feelings verbally. Actively listen to the person while waiting for them to pause for a breath and then take advantage of the opening to establish control of the conversation.
  • Set reasonable and enforceable limits of acceptable behavior for crowd members.
  • Call for assistance, as necessary.
RESPONSE TO A MOB

In the event of civil unrest, your first priority is always your personal safety and the safety of the persons and property you are protecting. Site administrators, supervisors, and security practitioners should take the following defensive steps.
  • Use an authoritative but non-hostile tone of voice when addressing a crowd. Maintain an upright, confident, and commanding posture.
  • Do not allow yourself to be surrounded by aggressive people. During a time of civil unrest symbols of authority can become targets for the mob's rage. Always be aware of your escape routes.
  • Ensure that all site personnel are informed of the situation and are sheltered.
  • Move people to pre-selected safe havens and secure the site against trespass and vandalism.
  • Maintain visible posts at all open access points, as long as it is safe to do so.
  • Restrict access by locking doors, gates, shutters, elevators, escalators, etc. (as per Post Orders).
  • Turn security cameras outward to view any disturbances and video tape as much activity as possible. • Use public address systems to keep building occupants informed of conditions. Remember to keep your voice calm and matter-of-fact at all times.
  • If there is no immediate threat and transportation is available, consider evacuating the occupants to a safer area.
  • If evacuation is not possible, use all available resources to prepare for prolonged habitation. Riots can sometimes last for days.
Be aware that in times of severe civil unrest authorities (police, fire, EMS) may not be able to immediately respond to calls for help. Be prepared to be as self-sufficient as possible.
  • First aid and medical supplies should be fully stocked.
  • Firefighting equipment should be fully operational and at hand.
  • Communications equipment (cell phones and radios) should be fully charged.
  • Flashlights should have fresh batteries and replacement batteries should be on hand.
Much of mob behavior has been associated with the anonymity of an individual in a crowd. Recent research has shown that when people are aware that their behavior is being recorded, they are more likely to conform to social norms and less likely to behave in a criminal manner. If you are equipped with a video recording device, make it known to any person you must confront. There is a good chance that the act of being recorded will cause the person to modify their behavior and deescalate the situation.

SAFETY IN THE FACE OF CHAOS

A mob is volatile and often uncontrollable. It can flare up and die down in minutes, or rage on for days. Depending on the specific conditions and circumstances that created the mob, you may be able to successfully restore calm by using the some of the techniques above. But never forget that your safety and the safety of the people you are protecting is your number one concern. If control is not possible, get yourself and others to safety as quickly as possible, immediately call for assistance, and secure the premises to the best of your a If there is no immediate threat and transportation is available, consider evacuating the occupants to a safer area.

Keep calm and collected as you prepare to ride out the wave of human frenzy that propels a mob.

Training Helps You Be Prepared

Mobs are unpredictable. The best way to deal with them is to prepare and train in advance. This article contains a number of preparation tips. You can find more good guidance about dealing with crowds and mobs by reviewing training courses available through the SCPD library and the Learning Management System (LMS) online classes. Working With Crowds, The World of Crowd Safety Management has good tips at http://www.workingwithcrowds.com/north-america-canada/.  Search for information about Crowd Control.

About Securitas

Securitas has been providing security services since 1934. With over 7,000 people in Canada and 310,000 people globally we have the experience and knowledge to offer a broad range of services; including On Site Security Guarding, Remote Guarding, Technology Solutions, Corporate Risk Management and Investigations. Our customized Integrated Security Solutions will meet all of your security needs, large or small. Please visit http://www.securitas.com/ca/en-ca/Services/On-Site-Guarding/ to know more about our Security Guard Services for Temporary Events Crowd Control

Monday, February 2, 2015

Winter's Double Danger: Cold and Carbon Monoxide

Winter can be a wonderful time of the year. Many parts of the country are blanketed with dazzling white snow. Winter sports lovers enjoy an abundance of skiing, ice skating, and sledding. And the kids all love building snowmen and snow forts for spectacular snowball fights! Yes, winter can be a joyous time, so long as you can retreat from the cold to the warmth inside your home. Unfortunately, winter is also a time when snow and ice storms play havoc with the power lines and leave many homes and businesses without heat or light. Be prepared to stay warm and protect your client's property and your own home.

Stay Warm and Safe at Work If you are on duty when a winter power outage strikes, you must be prepared. The simplest action you can take to stay warm is to add layers of clothing, so be sure to store the clothing you may need in your car or, if allowed, on the job site. Layering properly involves three types of clothing. Your first layer should be made of a fabric that will wick your perspiration away from your body and keep you dry. Thermal, or "long," underwear is generally best for this layer. The second layer is the insulating layer. The purpose of this layer is to trap your body heat. Fabrics such as fleece or wool are generally best for this layer. The third layer is protection against the weather. This layer should be of a fabric that will repel outside moisture, but still allow your sweat to evaporate.

Cover your hands, head, face, and feet properly too. Waterproof gloves and boots are a must and several layers of socks and a scarf are highly recommended. You may have to change your inner layer if it should become wet from perspiration, so be sure to have an extra set of inner layer garments on hand. You can find more information on layering by going to this travel information website http://gocanada.about.com/od/canadatravelplanner/tp/keep_warm_in_winter.htm

Your client may or may not have emergency generators. This may mean limited or no lighting or heating at the site. This is where your flashlight can become a lifesaving tool. Check the batteries on a regular basis and always have a fresh backup set on hand. When patrolling, use the light to illuminate your path, but do not keep it focused on the ground all the time. Move the light around so that you are also aware of what is in front, above, and on the sides of your path. Make sure there are no obstacles, pitfalls, or hazards in your direction of travel before you take that next step. If your route takes you near buildings or under trees or structures (scaffolds, towers, etc.) beware of falling ice and snow. As a security professional, and depending on your Post Orders, you may need to use your skills in observing, reporting, and assisting in response to incidents, such as:
  • People trapped outside in cold weather, possibly in a disabled vehicle.
  • Broken or poorly sealed windows, doors, skylights, vents, and other openings.
  • Obstructions to heaters, piping systems, radiators, burners, or boilers.
  • Unsafe walkways and floors inside or outside where ice, snow, or water presents a hazard.
  • Temperatures below 40 degrees Fahrenheit in buildings equipped with wet-pipe sprinkler systems.
  • Fire protection equipment stored in a location where it might freeze.
  • Persons trapped in a disabled elevator.

You should be extra vigilant to ensure that no unauthorized personnel gain access to the premises. Be alert and, as per your Post Orders, lock doors and gates as necessary. Remember to document the details of the power outage and the actions you take in response to the outage. You will need to know how long the power outage may last, so be sure to have a battery operated radio handy.

Stay Warm and Safe at Home

Helpfulness is a common value in Securitas employees. If you have power during an emergency, consider inviting family or friends to stay with you until their power is restored. If you lose power and it is possible for you to travel safely, you should consider staying with family or friends who have electricity or you could stay in a designated public shelter. Take steps to protect your water pipes from freezing. First fill containers with water for drinking in case you are without power for an extended period. You can also fill a bathtub with water to use for flushing toilets. Then, shut off the water supply to your house by closing the water supply inlet valve. If you are not able to shut off the water coming into your house, you should slightly open all the faucets in the house so that there is a slight trickle of water coming out of the faucets. Flowing water will not freeze as quickly as standing water. You can find more advice about protecting water pipes on the CTV news website. 


If you have a generator, you can use it to power electric space heaters, depending on its power output. Prepare in advance and have ready at least ten gallons of gasoline, stored in approved containers. Honda Canada has advice on safe operation and use of generators at http://powerequipment.honda.ca/safety /generators. Here are a couple of their important safety tips. 

  • Never operate a generator inside the home, including in the basement or garage. 
  • Do not hook a generator up to your home's wiring. Connect the equipment you want to power directly to the outlets on the generator.

If you use space heaters, follow the advice of the National Fire Protection Association about how to use them safely; http://www.nfpa.org/safety-information/for-consumers/causes/heating/heating-safety-tips You can heat your home with fireplaces, propane or kerosene heaters, or wood stoves. 

Make sure that they are properly vented and have a battery-operated carbon monoxide (CO) in the room. CO poisoning can result from the use of improperly vented heating equipment or vents that are clogged or leaky. This includes cracked or blocked chimneys. You cannot see or smell CO. Hypothermia and CO poisoning are both sneaky and deadly. The fumes may be fatal before anyone realizes there's a problem. If you suspect you've been exposed to carbon monoxide, get into fresh air immediately and seek emergency medical care. If possible, open windows and doors on the way out of the house. The two main threats you will face during a winter storm power failure are the cold and the possibility of carbon monoxide poisoning. 

Become familiar with the symptoms of both and seek medical attention as quickly as possible if you notice the symptoms of either condition.

Be Aware of Dangerous Symptoms

Do not let hypothermia sneak up on you. Be aware of the symptoms of mild and, severe hypothermia, and hypothermia in infants. A list of these symptoms and further information about hypothermia can be found on the Health Canada website, http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hl-vs/iyh-vsv/environ/cold-extreme-froid-eng.php

Guard against carbon monoxide poisoning by being on watch for its symptoms. You can find a list of symptoms and additional information about carbon monoxide poisoning at the Health Canada website, http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ewh-semt/air/in/poll/combustion/carbon-eng.php

Wednesday, January 21, 2015

The Dangers of Hypothermia & Carbon Monoxide - Be safe!



So many unique cold weather activities combined with the holiday season, winter can be a joyous time. Many parts of the country are blanketed with dazzling white snow. Sports lovers enjoy an abundance of skiing, ice skating, and sledding. All ages love building snowmen and snow forts for spectacular snowball fights. Winter is fun only so long as you can safely retreat from the cold when needed.

Personal Safety and Warmth The simplest action you can take to stay warm is to add layers of clothing, so be sure to store the clothing you may need in your car while traveling. Cover your

hands, head, face, and feet properly too. Gloves, scarf and boots are a must as well as dry warm, dry socks. Layering properly involves three types of clothing. Your first layer should be made of a fabric that will wick your perspiration away from your body and keep you dry. Thermal, or “long,” underwear is generally best for this layer. The second layer is the insulating layer. The purpose of this layer is to trap your body heat. Fabrics such as fleece or wool are generally best for this layer. The third layer is for protection against the weather. This layer should be of a fabric that will repel outside moisture, but still allow your sweat to evaporate.

Warm and Safe Accommodations

If you have power during an emergency, consider inviting family or friends to stay with you until their power is restored. If you lose power and it is possible for you to travel safely, you should consider staying with family or friends who have electricity or you could stay in a designated public shelter.

Take steps to protect your water pipes from freezing. First fill containers with water for drinking

in case you are without power for an extended period. You can also fill a bathtub with water to use for flushing toilets. Then, shut off the water supply to your house by closing the water supply inlet valve. If you are not able to shut off the water coming into your house, you should slightly open all the faucets in the house so that there is a slight trickle of water coming out of the faucets. Flowing water will not freeze as quickly as standing water. If you have a generator you can use it to power electric space heaters, depending on its power output. Prepare in advance and have ready at least ten gallons of gasoline, stored in approved containers. Remember to never operate a generator inside the home or garage.

You can provide heat with fireplaces, propane / kerosene heaters, or wood stoves. Don’t attempt to heat your entire home during the emergency. It will be more efficient and will make your heating fuel supply last longer if you block off rooms that do not need to be heated and stay in one room during the emergency.

Breath Easy

Make sure that they are properly vented and have a battery-operated carbon monoxide (CO) in the room. CO poisoning kills an average of 430 people every year. CO poisoning can result from the use of improperly vented heating equipment or vents that are clogged or leaky. This includes cracked or blocked chimneys. You cannot see or smell CO. Hypothermia and CO poisoning are both sneaky and deadly. The fumes may be fatal before anyone realizes there’s a problem. If you suspect you’ve been exposed to carbon monoxide, get into fresh air immediately and seek emergency medical care.

The two main threats you will face during a winter storm power failure are the cold and the possibility of carbon monoxide poisoning. Become familiar with the symptoms of both and seek medical attention as quickly as possible if you notice the symptoms of either condition. The invisible killer, carbon monoxide poisoning, can be especially dangerous for people who are sleeping or intoxicated.

Additional Information

Be aware of the symptoms of hypothermia http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hypothermia/basics/definition/con-20020453
Guard against CO poisoning http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/carbon-monoxide/basics/definition/con-20025444
Cold weather clothing tips http://www.army.mil/article/66527/Fight_the_Freeze/.
Safe generator operation http://www.redcross.org/news/article/RedCross-Offers-Safety-Steps-for-ExtremeCold.
Safe space heater operation http://www.bt.cdc.gov/disasters/winter/pdf/extreme-cold-guide.pdf.

This guide is for informational purposes only and does not contain Securitas Canada’s complete policy and procedures.

For more information, contact your Securitas Canada supervisor or account manager at www.securitasinc.ca

Thursday, January 15, 2015

Bank Robbery Derailed by Preventative Patrol


Pierre Gauthier   Securitas Patrol Supervisor resized 600

A recent string of bank robberies has plagued Southern Ontario and Quebec over the past few months, but thanks to a preventative patrol by a Securitas Mobile Patrol Officer, one was stopped.

On the rainy evening of December 25, 2014, Securitas Officer Antonio Jose (Tony) Vasconcelos was conducting a routine ATM vestibule patrol at a Montreal-area bank, when the officer noticed a large amount of water on the floor and base of the wall inside the bank.  The officer immediately notified the client and his Supervisor, Pierre Gauthier (pictured above), of his findings and then continued his inspection. 

Upon further investigation, the officers found that the leak was coming from a hole in the ceiling that attempted-robbers had created to try to break into the bank’s ATM room.   Vasconcelos and Gauthier contacted the police and remained on-site to further investigate the area.  They found that the suspect’s tools were left on-site and no money was taken from the ATM or the vault.

Police believe that the patrol inspection by Vasconcelos and Gauthier interrupted the burglary and caused the suspect(s) to flee before they could complete the robbery.

Patrol Supervisor Pierre Gauthier, who has 10 years experience in security, stated: “Upon entering the site, I had a funny feeling; my past experiences encouraged me to go further in my inspection. All the information pointed to a water pipe break, but we took the decision to verify further and then notify police so that a verification of the roof could be done. I am proud to have helped derail the attempted robbery in progress. Teamwork has contributed to the success of this event.”

This is a prime example that while you never know exactly when crime will strike, taking preventative measures such as security patrol inspections can help deter them from happening.